Tag: Wetland farming

Finding Beauty

Beauty exists in unexpected places. In the entangled geometry of fallen branches, in the wild weedy exuberance of spring, in the cleansing downpours and the spaces of rest between tasks. Those small moments of inspiration are the fuel that sustains me when life gets hard, when my best laid plans are thwarted, when I reach my limits. This spring has taken some unplanned turns due to physical limitations, but there is still great beauty to be found.

Thriving with Marginal Land

Marginal land is a term used to describe land that isn’t well suited to industrial scale farming. But for a small farmer with a little creativity, these spaces can offer unique potential for inspiring harvests and new forms of abundance. Read the full article to learn how I’m thriving with several types of marginal land here on the farm.

Why I Farm Native Plant Foods

I wasn’t much interested in native plants until I came to live on this land. I knew that native plants were good for the wildlife, and that they could be pretty, but I was only interested in edible plants. I could imagine native plants in the landscaping, because I had seen them there, but I never imagined them in food production. I had never seen them in orchards, I had never seen them in vegetable gardens, and I rarely saw them in garden catalogues. Little by little, the native plants won me over. Did you know many of them are edible? Read the full article to learn more!

Stages of Succession

The first year I took my land out of industrial corn/soy production, Butterweed, Daisy Fleabane, and Giant Ragweed took over. I tried to grow cover crops that year, and the Giant Ragweed was particularly difficult to work around. I was still trying to figure out what to do about these “problems” when they just…vanished. Now I have a lot of grasses and goldenrod, dandelion and violet, and lesser amounts of vine and tree volunteers. Even these plants are temporary, and eventually they’ll make way for the next stage of growth. It’s just another stage of succession in the land’s march back to its highest self.

The Raccoon Trees

Raccoons might be my favorite animals. I identify with them on a deep soul level, and I truly admire their adaptability, ingenuity, and curiousity. Their impressive cleverness is precisely what puts them into frequent conflict with the human world, a society that ironically prizes intelligence above all else. Raccoons find a way to survive and thrive no matter the circumstances, but tensions ease when there’s plenty for all. This article is about raccoons, mulberry trees, and cultivating greater abundance in our shared world.

The American Hazelnut (Corylus americana) : A Versatile Native Nut

The American Hazelnut (Corylus americana), also known as American Filbert, is a small tree or shrub in the Birch family. Although our native hazelnut is a different species than most hazelnuts available commercially, it is widely reported that the nuts produced by our native tree taste very similar to the more widely available European species. Read the full article to learn more about this amazing native food plant!

View More